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How do you overcome writer's block?

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Old 08-13-2017, 12:42 PM
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Default How do you overcome writer's block?


You're just getting ready to write, you've got your whole story planned out, a suspiciously large box of doughnut holes beside you and a laptop, all charged up and ready for action. But, no matter how hard you strain, the words don't come.

So, how do you slay this monster of the mind? running it down with the horse of willpower and determination? or perhaps just give it some time and pray it'll go away, perhaps terrorize a different writer? I want to hear your solutions, anecdotes, and anything in between!

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Old 08-13-2017, 03:15 PM
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When the words don't come I don't write. I do something else. It helps to have a busy life outside of writing.

I remember an interview with David Bowie where he said: if you want to recharge your creative batteries go get a boring job somewhere (not paraphrasing).

Writing is something that happens (good writing), it's not hard work.
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Old 08-13-2017, 03:58 PM
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that's probably what I do around 95% of the time. Solve the Rubick's cube a couple of times, read a book or something similar. The other 5% involves a lot of trashed and unfinished stories.

If I can get on a roll I can go all of the day, but getting on said roll takes a while. I haven't written in several weeks, then wrote a couple pieces and now I'm empty again.
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Old 08-13-2017, 07:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Lockette View Post
that's probably what I do around 95% of the time. Solve the Rubick's cube a couple of times, read a book or something similar. The other 5% involves a lot of trashed and unfinished stories.

If I can get on a roll I can go all of the day, but getting on said roll takes a while. I haven't written in several weeks, then wrote a couple pieces and now I'm empty again.


For me, interaction with normal everyday people is really important.
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Old 08-14-2017, 04:53 AM
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There are authors who have a very specific routine and they stick to it, even on days when it's not happening. And on those days, it's hard work.

I think more often than not, these are the writers who get things done -- who finish books and stories and move on the next one -- and I'm betting most of them would tell you there is no such thing as writer's block.

I often complain that I don't have the time to write, but the people I know who finish books seem to find the time no matter what. Writing is a priority -- not something they only do when they feel like it.

Last edited by Myers; 08-14-2017 at 04:55 AM..
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:46 AM
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Originally Posted by Lockette View Post
You're just getting ready to write, you've got your whole story planned out, a suspiciously large box of doughnut holes beside you and a laptop, all charged up and ready for action. But, no matter how hard you strain, the words don't come.

So, how do you slay this monster of the mind? running it down with the horse of willpower and determination? or perhaps just give it some time and pray it'll go away, perhaps terrorize a different writer? I want to hear your solutions, anecdotes, and anything in between!
Writing block is the luxury of those who don't have an immediate deadline.

If you're submitting an assignment for a degree course, or working in journalism, there just isn't time for the mood to be right and the muse to turn up in skimpy underwear with a Barry White CD. You just deliver.

Yeah, there are times when you're 'on your game' - and times when you're 'off key'. We no less need to get in the zone than an athlete. The urgency of deadline will force you to break through the wall.

It's easier when the incentive is financial and a known quantity. If writing is your sole income, it's a job and you deliver to get paid.

People approach writing according to their natures and personal body clock.

I certainly couldn't shut myself away and write all day. I like external stimulus. I prefer to write during the night - I'm more creative then.

Don't get hung up on it - just do what works for you.

A suggestion is to set a target for the month and build in days off during the week so you can recharge and keep things fresh. Whether that fits your personality type - only you can answer. x
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Old 08-14-2017, 01:40 PM
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Yeah, I never did have much trouble writing an essay. I guess it might be because I know what to write about? Most of my stuff comes from inspiration, a pure "Eureka!" moment where I have sudden clarity of what I think is good. one piece I wrote was about death and I had just read a couple chapters of 'Game of Thrones'.

Myers made an interesting point, and I think Grace touched on it as well. If it's a job or a required assignment, you have to kinda force yourself to write, and in my case, heavily edit it later. You can't wait for Mr./Ms. Muse to come and smack you.

Well, I would continue on, but I just had an interesting idea, you may see a piece later tonight.
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Old 08-15-2017, 02:12 PM
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Originally Posted by brianpatrick View Post
For me, interaction with normal everyday people is really important.
I have lots of interactions with everyday people, but not many of them are normal.
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Old 08-15-2017, 02:13 PM
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("...often it's just one step at a time isn't it..." proposed the goblin thinking that if one didn't fall under the spell of one own plot then those readers around one wouldn't fall for it neither, whereupon the goblin just smiled relating and repeating points he'd said before then, adding "...when fluid write, when dry edit, when in doubt read aloud...", not that the goblin knew anything about writing books per se, no he just liked poster's posts instead suspecting that most folks didn't want to read so much as they wanted to think up a reply, just they wanted something to go upon, smiling "...well now, are you thinking upon how you would reply to this post, so then can I not tempt you out of the block there a little further...", in fact, the goblin agreed with brianpatrick that one should converse with normal everyday people, stating "...so that's what I'm doing here I guess, only that they're conversing with a goblin, which makes them all highly suspicious in my view...", the post had written itself again)

Last edited by fleamailman; 08-15-2017 at 02:15 PM..
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Old 08-15-2017, 02:17 PM
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I've been chatting to you for years Flea. That means you're adorable and I'm a nut job.
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Myers View Post
I have lots of interactions with everyday people, but not many of them are normal.


Yeah, I meant to imply that. In fact, everyday people are mostly really interesting and complicated humans. I love that interaction with pre-judged perception and reality. It's what makes good stories.
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Old 08-15-2017, 05:25 PM
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Yeah, I knew what you meant. I was just screwing around.
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Old 08-16-2017, 01:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Grace Gabriel View Post
I've been chatting to you for years Flea. That means you're adorable and I'm a nut job.
("...years indeed..." replied the goblin ever here still, ever grateful though, and now thinking upon a younger workmate who had just had a stroke leaving her incapacitated, relating "...it's just that you look after the little man there while me I take care of this old man here, the old man who typed away while fending off his old age, the goblin lifted up his hand to the screen and the old man gave him highfive, somehow that was all it took to bring a smiles to their faces, worlds apart then, different lives too, yet with only one shared goal really, while the slot looking on whispered somewhere in the background anew "...the inner world forms while the outer world crumbles away, yes goblin one always plays to the audience as that brings out the best in one, yes a livewriter creates a replyship to be one, but in the end this writing has to be for oneself alone here lest one has misses out on that journey to self that all this posting becomes, so leave royalties for those writers goblin, rapport is the currency of us livewriters now...", years pass and still nothing ever seemed to change that understanding there)

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