WritersBeat.com
 

Go Back   WritersBeat.com > General Discussion > The Library

The Library Reviews and opinions on published writing: prose and poetry.


Mein Kampf

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #61  
Old 06-19-2006, 02:55 PM
Massoud's Avatar
Massoud (Offline)
I Am My Own Master
Official Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 108
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default


Originally Posted by starrwriter
I'm not contradicting myself. A discerning person can read ideological ravings like "Mein Kampf" without being corrupted by the hatred. A person with a shaky identity and no self-confidence might adopt any ridiculous belief they encounter. Every cult leader uses this weakness to recruit followers.
Of course, but we aren't talking about discerning people, are we? People like Hitler don't write books like Mein Kampf to attract "discerning" people, now do they?

There is a reason why such books lack any serious intellectual level.

Your political thinking is one-track demagoguery.
How is workers emancipation "one-track demagoguery"?

Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 06-20-2006, 02:44 PM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Good for you, you read trash and it didn't trash your mind. What was your mental age and powers of discernment at the time? Were you a teenage girl who doesn't know if she should or shouldn't read this book because she heard "good and bad things about it"? Would you make this a homework assignment for middle schoolers with no discussion about it?

I never advocated burning any books. I never told her that she would become a nazi if she read it. What I said was absolutely true - once you read something or have a thought, you can never unread or unthink it. Would you invite Charles Manson in to speak to a group of teenagers? That's knowledge. That would give them an understanding of who he is and what he thinks.

It's not surprising that you would quote Timothy Leary - the man who never met a mind altering drug he didn't like. Another quote of his, "In the future it's not going to be what book you read, but what chemical do you use to open your mind to accelerate learning." Another great quote of his, "The two most evil people alive today are the Pope and Mother Theresa".

There is an age and maturity appropriateness for books that seek to sway a person to controversial way of thinking. Not many teenagers are ready for an unchallenged absorbtion of the words of a madman.
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 06-21-2006, 05:08 AM
xfacktor's Avatar
xfacktor (Offline)
Anyone seen my red pen?
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 667
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to xfacktor Send a message via MSN to xfacktor Send a message via Yahoo to xfacktor
Default

Originally Posted by gary_wagner
Once you read something or have a thought, you can never unread or unthink it.
Are you serious? Tell me youíre joking. People can think new thoughts and change viewpoints all the time. Here's an illustration: Earlier in my life I attended a prestigious seminary school of the orthodox Presbyterian variety. Today, I'm not a Christian at all. However, under your theory, since I used to think Christian thoughts, I'm still a Christian. I had lots of thoughts when I was young, and those thoughts are completely different now. But, you're telling me that those earlier thoughts, since I can't "unthink" them or unread books Iíve read, are still with me. Guess what? They're not.

Onward, is Timothy Leary incapable of expressing a true thought? All because he desired hallucinogenic drugs does that mean we discount everything he ever said? Absolutely not. In fact, youíre allowing bias to blur the lines of thought. In your view, it isn't the thought expressed that's important, but the quality of the person who said it. If there ever was bullshit, that's it. Say, for example, you believed George W. Bush was an honorable person with character (NOT!), are you going to accept what he tells you simply because you thought he was a man of character? I wouldn't, but you've expressed that the perceived character quality of the person is more important than the individual thought expressed. That's sad.

To answer your questions, I read the Satanic Bible when I was 13-years-old, Hermetics/Golden Dawn/Ceremonial Magic literature when I was 15, Mein Kampf at 16, and The Communist Manifesto and Das Kapital right after that. Iím not a Satanist, an occult practitioner, a Communist or a Nazi.

There are books and letters, on the other hand, which have influenced me more than others: Thomas Paineís Common Sense, Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, and works from Robert Ingersoll and Immanuel Kant. And through it all, the only advice I would give anyone is to think for yourself and form your own opinions only after researching as many different perspectives on an issue as possible. And that includes all perspectives, not only the ones deemed acceptable by the public or conforms to the current zeitgeist.
__________________
My blog at
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by xfacktor; 06-21-2006 at 05:18 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 06-21-2006, 06:18 AM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

You still have the words you read and you still have the thoughts you thought. You may have a different opinion about them, but you still have them. You may or may not have agreed with the words at the time - it doesn't matter; you still have the words. I'm glad reading bullshit didn't influence your 13 year old mind. I couldn't have handled it at 13, my children couldn't have handled it when they were 13, and I don't know how many 13 year old's could. I would fight to keep these books out of the hands of adolescents just as much as I would for pornography, and extreme violence. They need to be protected from things they can't handle until they are ready to handle it.

You admit that you have been influenced by writers. In his day, Thomas Paine was labeled an extreme left wing radical. He is still controversial today. You happen to agree with him and your life was influenced by his books. You read Mein Kampf and apparently didn't agree with Hitler's view of the world and therefore weren't influenced by him. That certainly doesn't mean that books do not have the power to sway people. It just means that different books will sway different people at different times in different ways.

Knowledge is power. People need to understand Hitler. People should read Mein Kampf if they want to understand the psyche of that madman, but not until they are ready to weigh his actions against his words. If they want to know how evil he was they only have to look at what he did. If they want to know how crazy his is, they should read his words. If they don't understand what he did and only read what he says, they expose themselves to the risk of being influenced by their lack of knowledge. Incomplete information is not necessarily knowledge.

I never said that Mein Kampf is not deemed acceptable for the public. I said that it is a book that has in the past, and can still influence people who use it as their sole source of information on Hitler. There are millions of skinheads, neo-nazis, and white supremicists in the world today that use Mein Kampf as their bible and Hitler as their prophet. That means that there are millions of people in this world without the mental capacity and reasoning powers to see the whole picture.

I guessed the age of person who started this thread at about 16, later finding out they are 19. Because of that, and these back and forth comments, I amend my original "don't read it" to "don't read it unless you also read about the horrors he committed.".
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 06-21-2006, 09:59 AM
starrwriter's Avatar
starrwriter (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 4,280
Thanks: 0
Thanks 4
Default

Originally Posted by gary_wagner
...I amend my original "don't read it" to "don't read it unless you also read about the horrors he committed.".
I can agree with that. To understand where Hitler's ideas led, the reader should be familiar with the facts of the Holocaust and the history of World War II in Europe and Russia.

A footnote: when Hitler prepared to commit suicide in the Berlin bunker, he said he was aware he would be judged harshly for losing a war he started, but he thought the world would thank him for ridding Europe of Jews. He died completely out of touch with reality (perhaps because he had been a drug addict for years.)
__________________
"The earth was made round so we can't see too far down the road and know what is coming." -- Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 06-21-2006, 10:44 AM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

OK, then. I'm glad we found some middle ground.

Now how about starting a thread about those google ads at the top of the screen. Mine are now "What was Hitler's Fate" and "Become a Powerful Leader - You can learn to conquer the world". The ads across the bottom are "Adolf Hitler", "Nazi", "Hitler's Mein Kampf", "NSDAP", and "Life of Adolf Hitler". That's sort of freaking me out in a "big brother" kind of way. I still don't like google-bots reading what I write - which is why I don't like gmail very much.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 06-21-2006, 11:47 AM
xfacktor's Avatar
xfacktor (Offline)
Anyone seen my red pen?
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 667
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to xfacktor Send a message via MSN to xfacktor Send a message via Yahoo to xfacktor
Default

I also show Anti-Semitism and Combating Terrorism for Google ads.

Starrwriter: To achieve Holocaust factualism, wouldn't you have to research the literature from scholars that present the orthodox and accepted view of the Holocaust as well as from experts and scholars (forensic and historical) who take a much different (historical revisionist) view of the Holocaust?

I'd be willing to wager that Gary would say there's no reason to read literature from scholars who disagree with the traditional view of the Holocaust because only insane and evil people would think that not everything the ďauthoritiesĒ have told about the Holocaust is true. However, I'd argue that regardless of the topic and no matter how taboo it is, we can't form an accurate opinion if we limit ourselves to one side of the story. Letís call it: perspective exclusiveness.

It's difficult (even for independent thinkers) to put aside presuppositions and biases on certain issues to see a subject for the first time or under a different light. The older we get and the more set in our ways we become, the more likely we are to reject new viewpoints or evidence. Yet, if we're ever going to progress as a species (sometimes I think we're regressing), thoughts, ideas, philosophies, and even historical "facts" should continually be examined, scrutinized, evaluated and searchingly analyzed.

Therefore, if Hitler was a madman, it'll be evident in his writings. But, if you read Mein Kampf looking for a madman, then that's what you'll find. It's better to be open minded and let the painfully obvious manifest itself rather than to transpose a belief onto something where it may not exist.

In the end, I'd rather think for myself and develop my own thoughts rather than let someone define for me what's good and evil or right and wrong, including what books I read.
__________________
My blog at
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 06-21-2006, 12:37 PM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

xfacktor, I think we agree on more of this than you realize. I lived in Saudi Arabia for 5 years. You want to talk about a heavily censored, we'll decide what you will and won't read society? I've read books that lay out point by point why the holocaust is a myth. I've been to the holocaust musuem and read books about it. I've been in Germany and visited the rail stations that were used to load up the "cattle cars" I formed my opinion on it based on both sides of the argument.

I'm not talking about censorship, book burning, or suppression of viewpoints I don't agree with. My main issue is protecting children from one-sided presentations of twisted writings that can lead them to uninformed and destructive thinking and actions. That includes the Bible. There's some pretty violent and vindictive stuff in there that can, and has led many young people astray. I maintain that there are many books that present information that uninformed and immature children are not ready for. We need to help our children get ready to go out into the world and make their own decisions. We shouldn't throw them into the water too soon and tell them to sink or swim. Let's at least teach them to swim before we throw them in.
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 06-21-2006, 12:46 PM
xfacktor's Avatar
xfacktor (Offline)
Anyone seen my red pen?
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 667
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to xfacktor Send a message via MSN to xfacktor Send a message via Yahoo to xfacktor
Default

Alright, we agree. Parents should decide what's best for their children.
__________________
My blog at
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 06-21-2006, 01:14 PM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Agreed. Here's are some applicable quotes to end on:

Protect me from knowing what I don't need to know. Protect me from even knowing that there are things to know that I don't know. Protect me from knowing that I decided not to know about the things that I decided not to know about. Amen.

Lord, lord, lord. Protect me from the consequences of the above prayer. ~Douglas Adams
A compromise is an agreement whereby both parties get what neither of them wanted. ~Author Unknown
Man was predestined to have free will. ~Hal Lee Luyah


The surest sign that intelligent life exists elsewhere in the universe is that it has never tried to contact us. ~Bill Watterson, Calvin and Hobbes
Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize them, you're a mile way and you have their shoes. ~Author Unknown

Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 09-03-2006, 11:41 PM
War Hawk (Offline)
Let me introduce myself
New Author
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

Originally Posted by ApplCobbler
This isn't one of those books that you should brag about reading later on in life.
It was a very important and history-changing book; even if Hitler wasn't a good writer and everybody despises him, that doesn't mean you shouldn't read it. The fact that everyone is so bent out of shape over it in this thread is kind of sad.

Last edited by War Hawk; 09-03-2006 at 11:45 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 09-03-2006, 11:48 PM
War Hawk (Offline)
Let me introduce myself
New Author
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

Originally Posted by gary_wagner
The original post was several months ago and yes, this thread was sent completely off track. I was thinking about the original question posed by adurna. My answer is no, do not read this book. What would be the possible purpose for this? For knowledge? If that's true then why don't you go find as many snuff movies as you can and sit through them so you can get the knowledge of one person killing another? Find the most horrible, vile, and disgusting books with descriptions of rape, murder, disembowelment, beheading, torture, and the many horrible things that humans do to each other and read them so you are filled with knowledge. You will be enlightened and understand your enemy, right?

When you open up the pages of this book you are offering Adolf Hitler an open invitation to put his thoughts into your mind, permitting him to try to convince you that his twisted, warped, evil thoughts are right and true, and you are willingly injecting poison into your brain that will be there for the rest of your life. You will from that point forward share your life and your mind with Adolf Hitler. He will forever be a part of you.

You should resist whatever childish peer pressure or morbid curiosity that is driving you to want to do something as foolish and permanently destructive as this. Hitler raped the minds of the German youth by forcibly injecting his thoughts into theirs. You are inviting Adolf Hitler to rape yours. Except they unwittingly allowed their minds to be twisted, you are rolling out the welcome matt for Adolf Hitler to screw your brain.

Don't do it.
I'm almost afraid to imagine how closed-minded you act with more important matters.
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 01-28-2007, 01:17 PM
rhiloaded (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Bognor Regis
Posts: 22
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default Back to the book in question:

This is a fascinating thread and it has gone a long way from the original question - re: reading Mein Kampf. I tried it about ten years ago, out of curioisty and with not a little guilt, trying to understand what made Hitler tick. It was the most boring, introspective diatribe I have ever come across. My answer would be : read it by all means, I totally agree with the person who said we have to be aware of these things if we are to have hope of preventing them from happening again , ( and I have little faith it will.) but don't expect any insights from it into Naziism or anything else.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 01-29-2007, 12:47 PM
novu (Offline)
Typist
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 69
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

""Learn as much by writing as by reading."

Watching television is more damaging.

I find it awful that people actually tell others not to read something.

Even something as awful as the Marquis de Sade's 120 Days of Sodom. Read it by all means, because then you learn something about humanity.

Interesting thread.

novu
__________________
I have only words to play with
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 01-30-2007, 08:51 AM
Cuchulain's Avatar
Cuchulain (Offline)
Word Wizard
Official Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: NY
Posts: 705
Thanks: 54
Thanks 22
Send a message via Skype™ to Cuchulain
Default

Those with extreme leftist views (Communism) have always been hostile.
Well, I'm sorry you find me "hostile".
Reply With Quote
  #76  
Old 01-30-2007, 11:16 AM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Go ahead and consider me hostile, I don't really care. I'll state what I said still another way that maybe some people will understand and quit calling me closed minded and a book burner.

By all means read this book if you are curious about it and if you are mature enough to understand that a sick twisted demented man who put six million innoncent men and women into furnaces and burned them because of their religion wrote that trash.

If someone had put this book into the hands of my children when they were 14 or younger I would have tracked them down and kicked the everloving shit out of them. Yes, knowledge is power. Misunderstood knowledge is the most powerful of all.

You want to put the evil demented words of Hitler into your head? Go ahead, its certainly no worse than the trash you can read elsewhere or watch on network TV. You want to understand how sick and twisted this maniac was? Go look at some pictures of the people he starved, killed, and burned. Read some history. If you are ready to read his words, go look at his actions too. Make sure you understand the source of that "knowledge" first to decide if it is really knowledge or if it is the purest form of evil bullshit.
Reply With Quote
  #77  
Old 01-30-2007, 05:43 PM
ronoxQ (Offline)
Eye in the Sky
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 442
Thanks: 0
Thanks 2
Default

Gary, I think calling anybody twisted and demented and leaving it at that is harmful. Hitler was evil, certainly. He was almost certainly insane - of course, if he wasn't, then he'd be even scarier.

However, you need to remember that "evil" covers a large field. Some people find abortionists evil. Some people find antiabortionists even more so. Calling Hitler evil and looking at him in only that light is just as harmful as calling him a saint, though it's certainly not as brilliant.

"Mein Kampf" is not just rambling, demented writings. When Hitler wrote them, he had a clear view on what he wanted the world to be. He was quite certain of his beliefs, and they contain logic, albeit twisted logic. He had some interesting ideas about the economy, and like it or not, many of his thoughts have been incorporated into the world today. Evil? Yes. But literature is the study of cause, not just effect. For this alone, Mein Kampf is worth reading: to try and learn why.
Reply With Quote
  #78  
Old 02-01-2007, 02:36 AM
gary_wagner
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

If Mein Kampf was a set of wild ramblings of insanity and gave you a good picture of who Hitler really was - not what he said in this book, it would be a good way to understand him. That's not what it is. I have already admitted I haven't read the entire book, but the excerpts I have read seem reasoned and make some sense, which is why this book is not how to find out what a lunatic Hitler was. That's also why reading this book alone - with no other input puts a false picture into the mind of the reader - especially younger and impressionable minds. Several people I have talked to come away from this book with the feeling, maybe he wasn't so bad after all. My God, maybe he wasn't so bad?

I stick with my call for age appropriateness. I think when people are ready to understand how a man like this could be elevated to such power, and the horrors of the holocaust they are ready to read this as one source - but not the only source, of understanding history and this madman.

Go back to the original post that started this thread. The person who posted only posted a total of seven times here and has been long gone for a while, but she said, "I've been told both good and bad things about it". To me that screams that she didn't have the maturity level to be ready for this book. Sure, that might be condescending and judgemental on my part, but I feel protective of all impressionable teens. Hitler is a phenomenon that needs to be understood. Hitler himself is not the best source to give people a true understanding of what he was and what he did. His words convinced an entire nation to give him unlimited power. His words still convince people today that he was a great and wise man and there are dedicated followers of his philosophies. You need to be careful how his words are weighed against reality.
Reply With Quote
  #79  
Old 02-01-2007, 09:27 AM
starrwriter's Avatar
starrwriter (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Honolulu, Hawaii
Posts: 4,280
Thanks: 0
Thanks 4
Default

It's misleading to blame only Hitler for what the Nazis did. Of course he was a lunatic, but one lunatic is not a danger to the rest of the world. The vast majority of German people behaved like sheep and the consequences of this were predictable.

(Note my new signature.)
__________________
"The earth was made round so we can't see too far down the road and know what is coming." -- Isak Dinesen, Out of Africa
Reply With Quote
  #80  
Old 02-02-2007, 01:01 PM
ronoxQ (Offline)
Eye in the Sky
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 442
Thanks: 0
Thanks 2
Default

Originally Posted by gary_wagner View Post
If Mein Kampf was a set of wild ramblings of insanity and gave you a good picture of who Hitler really was - not what he said in this book, it would be a good way to understand him. That's not what it is. I have already admitted I haven't read the entire book, but the excerpts I have read seem reasoned and make some sense, which is why this book is not how to find out what a lunatic Hitler was. That's also why reading this book alone - with no other input puts a false picture into the mind of the reader - especially younger and impressionable minds. Several people I have talked to come away from this book with the feeling, maybe he wasn't so bad after all. My God, maybe he wasn't so bad?

I stick with my call for age appropriateness. I think when people are ready to understand how a man like this could be elevated to such power, and the horrors of the holocaust they are ready to read this as one source - but not the only source, of understanding history and this madman.

Go back to the original post that started this thread. The person who posted only posted a total of seven times here and has been long gone for a while, but she said, "I've been told both good and bad things about it". To me that screams that she didn't have the maturity level to be ready for this book. Sure, that might be condescending and judgemental on my part, but I feel protective of all impressionable teens. Hitler is a phenomenon that needs to be understood. Hitler himself is not the best source to give people a true understanding of what he was and what he did. His words convinced an entire nation to give him unlimited power. His words still convince people today that he was a great and wise man and there are dedicated followers of his philosophies. You need to be careful how his words are weighed against reality.
Okay, sorry. I misinterpreted what you'd said before.

I agree with age-appropriateness, but it depends on the reader. Many people read earlier and more maturely than others, that's for certain.
Reply With Quote
  #81  
Old 03-05-2007, 02:30 PM
Alyosha's Avatar
Alyosha (Offline)
Copyist
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 47
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Send a message via AIM to Alyosha Send a message via Yahoo to Alyosha
Default


Adurna, read it by all means. Hitler was undeniably a genius with a brilliance for recognizing talent.

He also happened to be one of the most evil men who ever lived (easily on a par with our pal Joe Stalin, but not quite that heinous).

His genius is undeniable - he built Germany up from the ashes of her post WWI hellhole and conquered all of Continental Europe. It's not every day that happens.

I shouldn't even have to say it, but I'm not a Neo-Nazi. I fundamentally disagree with totalitarian fascism, though I consider Marxism to be the greater threat to liberty.

The fact that Adolf was one of the most evil men in history does not detract from the fact that he was brilliant. The more intelligent we are, the more capable of committing atrocities we are. It's no accident that the Nazis were some of the most talented innovaters in the entire war.

A mentally retarded man is capable of only so much evil. A man of average intelligence capable of average evil, a smart man capable of great evil, and a genius capable of the worst evil yet. The genius is capable of both great good and great evil. Hitler and Stalin and ben Laden were and are evil geniuses.

So by all means read Mein Kampf. Let me warn you, however, that' it occaisionally is very dull and very very thick. If you're a committed reader, you'll polish it off in a couple of weeks and gain a new respect for evil geniuses, as well as a determination to ensure that nothing like that happens again.


__________________
[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

Music is painted upon the canvas of silence.
~Mozart
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 03-16-2007, 06:37 PM
doddles (Offline)
Pencil pusher
Official Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

I have read MK before, and as a teen too (since all the adults condemn it).

It sucks! It was so boring and it didn't make sense and it wasn't even a (maybe translator's fault?) well written piece of rhetoric.

I think even David Duke is better at making Jews look evil. Or maybe Duke didn't have a translator to mess him up.

Later, reading Hitler's biographies, you feel that he really isn't a genius, even an evil one. He was good at certain things (eg demogoguery) . But don't let his 'success' in creating hell mislead you.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 12-10-2008, 10:20 PM
TimH (Offline)
Typist
Official Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 73
Thanks: 23
Thanks 12
Default

I have read Mein Kamph and for the most part found it quite boring. There are some times where you just think to yourself "This guy was an absolute monster, how could you seriously follow someone who would put this in print?" and other times where I was suprised to read intelligent political insight. You have to remember Hitler was a very intelligent person, you can't baffle a Nation unless you are. But it's also very important to read this work knowing the dangers that lay within and remember the horrors that stemmed from his ideology
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 12-11-2008, 09:14 AM
Hunter_Killer (Offline)
Intellectually Fertile
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 168
Thanks: 0
Thanks 0
Default

good god.....

While I think anyone should read what they want, can we please close this thread or something? It keeps breaking out into more political and social off-topics than a random thread.... Either everyone give their opinion on JUST the book or someone lock this up...

As for my oppinion, go for it and read it. While this was about... 2 years from when it all started, anyone who looks in here should choose their own option if they want to or not, or to look for suggestions. But let your own choice deciede what you do and say and no one else.

And there is my 2 cents
Reply With Quote
Reply

  WritersBeat.com > General Discussion > The Library


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Last person to reply wins! maylet Board Games 11767 02-06-2016 02:39 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 02:26 PM.

vBulletin, Copyright © 2000-2006, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.