WritersBeat.com
 

Go Back   WritersBeat.com > General Discussion > Writers' Cafe

Writers' Cafe Get a drink, sit down to relax, and chit-chat with other writers.


Why do people hate Stephenie Meyer?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-19-2014, 04:37 AM
crochetlady99's Avatar
crochetlady99 (Offline)
I Am My Own Master
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 100
Thanks: 29
Thanks 25
Icon5 Why do people hate Stephenie Meyer?


I see, left and right, people speaking of how Stephenie Meyer is a horrible writer. First off, her books are targeted for young adult, and as a writer of ya I understand why she writes as she does. And what's so wrong with her ideas? Her books are all bestsellers. Doesn't she have to be doing something right?

__________________
"The talent of writing is a gift from God."
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-19-2014, 07:14 AM
Mike C's Avatar
Mike C (Offline)
Legend
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 9,117
Thanks: 99
Thanks 1,572
Send a message via MSN to Mike C
Default

She's a successful writer, therefore a target. We all wish we could be so horrible.

My issue with Meyer isn't her writing, but her poor, stereotypical female MC - always a victim, always needing a guy to rescue her.

Far better in that respect is The Hunger Games - strong, proactive female role model.
__________________
لا شيء يدوم‎
Reply With Quote
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Mike C For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-19-2014), fleamailman (08-20-2014), Floyd (08-24-2014), RaineDrop (08-21-2014)
  #3  
Old 08-19-2014, 08:01 AM
crochetlady99's Avatar
crochetlady99 (Offline)
I Am My Own Master
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 100
Thanks: 29
Thanks 25
Default

Oh, I see that could be a problem for some people. I enjoy those books, but I'd rather write about independent girls or girls learning to be independent. There is hope for my genre, then.
__________________
"The talent of writing is a gift from God."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-19-2014, 01:45 PM
Front&Centre's Avatar
Front&Centre (Offline)
Heartbreaking Writer of Staggering Genius
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: London
Posts: 1,289
Thanks: 201
Thanks 199
Default

I think that there are just a lot of people who dislike her stories because for whatever reason they're not aimed at adult men. Also, I think fans of the vampire/supernatural genre as it existed at the time of the Twilight movie release were offended by the aesthetic of the entire thing, which was, again, aimed at teenage girls and women.

As I understand it, Stephenie Meyer isn't particularly mocked for being a bad writer, like other famous authors (Dan Brown), so much as people tend to think her content is superfluous and without substance and merit. But then, isn't so much Y/A fiction?
In her defence, it's difficult to write Y/A because it can be quite a challenge to create real threat for your characters and give your story a universal meaning/moral (as opposed to a thinly-veiled fantasy about someone quite like you managing to survive american high-school) when you've got to keep your content PG-13.

I've personally not read much of Stephenie Meyer's work, simply because I was too old to read her stories when they came out, and had the wrong set of genitalia.
In fact, I kind of missed out on Y/A fiction altogether. I skipped that stage. I think it was because I was so into Warhammer (yes, those nerdy little figurines) as a kid, and went strait to Military Sci-Fi.
In fact, from ages 12-16 I hardly read anything else.
__________________
If trees could scream, would we be so quick to chop them down? We might, if they screamed all the time for no good reason.

Last edited by Front&Centre; 08-19-2014 at 01:48 PM..
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Front&Centre For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-20-2014)
  #5  
Old 08-19-2014, 07:35 PM
Alien (Offline)
I Am My Own Master
Official Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 89
Thanks: 50
Thanks 12
Default

Stories like that have always irritated the alien. The alien has never read twilight, but would like to mention; "Most of the fans of the trilogy will admit how poor quality it is. On the other hand, fans of books like 'Hunger games' and 'The fault in our stars' will not say a bad thing about them."
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Alien For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-20-2014)
  #6  
Old 08-19-2014, 08:10 PM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

aimed at teenage girls and women.
Offensive to teenage girls and women.
But then, isn't so much Y/A fiction?
In her defence, it's difficult to write Y/A because it can be quite a challenge to create real threat for your characters and give your story a universal meaning/moral
Since when does a book that is relevant to teenagers have to be like that? And it actually isn't that hard if you respect your audience and remember that teenagers have brains. PG-13 is also not mandatory. The only reason Hunger Games got that rating as a movie is because they were clever with camera angles.

There is also a great deal of fiction marketed to teenagers that has a lot of substance. Also, the "morals" of Twilight are dangerous. They make an abusive stalker seem romantic and it give the girls no choices in life. I've been stalked before, and know how frightening it is. But the girls who read this book don't seem to understand that.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Rei For This Useful Post:
Alien (08-19-2014), crochetlady99 (08-20-2014)
  #7  
Old 08-20-2014, 09:02 AM
Front&Centre's Avatar
Front&Centre (Offline)
Heartbreaking Writer of Staggering Genius
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: London
Posts: 1,289
Thanks: 201
Thanks 199
Default

Offensive to teenage girls and women.
"Aimed at" and "offensive to" are not exclusive to each other. It can be, and apparently is, both.

I should say that I cannot write Y/A fiction because I find that my characters' reactions to life-threatening, gut-wrenching or horrifying events are not often particularly kid-friendly. Keep in mind that when I think of Y/A I think of 12-14 year olds. Perhaps I am wrong in thinking of that age range?

My thoughts are that if you can put what you want into a Y/A story, why make it Y/A at all? Surely you can't go all out on the gore and emotional trauma when you're writing a book aimed at kids.
I mean, I'm honestly not particularly well versed in what makes good Y/A fiction and what most of it is comprised of.
I assume you are?
I would be genuinely interested in what you think are the rules you should follow / lines you can't cross when writing for younger audiences.

I made a mistake in my original post by mentioning morals.
I'm not really that bothered about morals in books. The existence of a deliberate moral in a story implies that you should be learning something from what the characters say and do. I don't honestly think an author should be responsible for the effect the actions of their characters have on impressionable readers. That implies that an authour should not write characters with shades of grey. That you should be able to tell, as a reader, whether a character is of the light-side or dark-side without any difficulty at all. That it should be clear who is the good guy and who is the bad guy. That sounds pretty darn restricting to me.
The author should not be considered when you're looking for someone to blame because little jimmy got caught stalking the neighbor kid with a backpack full of obscene drawings. He copied the actions of a character he identified with. Is that the author's fault for writing a mostly relatable character with questionable morals?
__________________
If trees could scream, would we be so quick to chop them down? We might, if they screamed all the time for no good reason.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-20-2014, 10:51 AM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

"Aimed at" and "offensive to" are not exclusive to each other. It can be, and apparently is, both.
I think you misunderstood me there.

My thoughts are that if you can put what you want into a Y/A story, why make it Y/A at all?
We have a tendency in this day and age to assume people under 19 can't handle anything, and will go out and do all kinds of crazy things just because they read a book. Creating a good book or movie for teenagers is not about censoring. It is about what is appealing and relevant to people in that age group. Make it for teenagers by making it specifically relevant to teenagers.

The fact is, when you make it too easy or censor it too much, kids just skip over it. I don't mean all books meant for teens should have lots of violence and sex. We just shouldn't be afraid to use it any more than we do with adult books. YA is about things that are specific to that age group, or are from the point of view of that age group.

As for the gore and trauma aspect of it, especially when writing fiction set in an existing world, if it can happen to teenagers, teenagers should be allowed to read about it. As an educator and (if I ever find a man) a parent, I make sure to keep an eye on what kinds of books they are reading and discuss things with them as I deem it necessary. I mean, we're not talking about ten year olds. We're talking about people in high school and university.

The existence of a deliberate moral in a story implies that you should be learning something from what the characters say and do. I don't honestly think an author should be responsible for the effect the actions of their characters have on impressionable readers. That implies that an authour should not write characters with shades of grey.
I don't think that's entirely accurate either. The writer is not responsible, but they can write stories that tell the reader something important, and it does not prevent them from making three dimensional characters.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Rei; 08-20-2014 at 10:53 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-20-2014, 11:38 AM
Front&Centre's Avatar
Front&Centre (Offline)
Heartbreaking Writer of Staggering Genius
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: London
Posts: 1,289
Thanks: 201
Thanks 199
Default

Y/A includes people up to the age of 19?!

Surely not.

by 16, if you're into reading, you're reading adult books.
I would have thought that the Venn diagram of what early teenagers (13/14) want out of a book and what late teenagers (18/19) want out of a book has barely any overlap at all.

Perhaps I was using the wrong terminology, then, but if you write for young people (12-15) then the publishers must force you to tone down the adult content, no? Otherwise the concept of books for people older than 11 but younger than 16 wouldn't exist.
__________________
If trees could scream, would we be so quick to chop them down? We might, if they screamed all the time for no good reason.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-20-2014, 11:50 AM
max crash's Avatar
max crash (Offline)
Always Online
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: The Keep, just beyond the orbit of mars
Posts: 2,239
Thanks: 147
Thanks 404
Default

YA readers are much older that 19 - they are sometimes in their 60s because they are looking for that gentler time when they were young and as a result they buy this type of book for their grandchildren and a whole new cycle begins.

and while war hammer may or may not be out of play; people who played it will always think of it and take comfort in it as part of their youth - it's true of any story and any genre.

Meyer understood that and exploited it. it was her version of her youth and apparently it appealed to a lot of people.
__________________
if you're writing over your readers head - tum etiam, ut graece scribens --- the secret of success changes;the truth of failure remains constant; if you try to please everyone you will fail.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-20-2014, 12:32 PM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

Originally Posted by Front&Centre View Post
Y/A includes people up to the age of 19?!

Surely not.

by 16, if you're into reading, you're reading adult books.
I would have thought that the Venn diagram of what early teenagers (13/14) want out of a book and what late teenagers (18/19) want out of a book has barely any overlap at all.

Perhaps I was using the wrong terminology, then, but if you write for young people (12-15) then the publishers must force you to tone down the adult content, no? Otherwise the concept of books for people older than 11 but younger than 16 wouldn't exist.
No, you were using the right words, just not recognizing that YA is not a genre, though a lot of people treat it like it is. It is a demographic. You're also being very narrow in your ideas about what a person will want to read because of their age, and perhaps (as many people do) almost forgetting that teenagers are individuals. Sometimes the target demographic is 14+ for a book labeled as YA, anyway. Even so, I knew a girl in grade 6 who read the Hunger Games and was not traumatized. I also knew an 8-year-old who was reading Jane Austen.

And yes, most people at 16 will be reading adult books, but they have not abandoned the teen section, either. Many of those books are still relevant to them, and they are also just as likely to be damn good books. As a teenager, I read books in both sections of the library. At 28, I still do. Like I said, the good books meant for teenagers are specifically relevant to teenagers. However, they can be enjoyed equally by adults. A war memoir called "Generals Die in Bed" was reprinted to be sold to teenagers, and we read it in my grade 12 English class. It was not originally meant for teenagers, but as the soldier was 18 when he enlisted, it was relevant to teenagers.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-20-2014, 01:07 PM
Front&Centre's Avatar
Front&Centre (Offline)
Heartbreaking Writer of Staggering Genius
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: London
Posts: 1,289
Thanks: 201
Thanks 199
Default

I think I understand what you're saying,

but...

A war memoir called "Generals Die in Bed" was reprinted to be sold to teenagers, and we read it in my grade 12 English class.
I'm assuming they did something to that book (which I've never read) when they reprinted it for teens, right?
What did they edit?
What separates the adult version and the teen version?

I'm also not saying that a Y/A book can't be good because it's aimed at a younger audience, and I know that the main thing about Y/A fiction is that the issues are relevant to young people (which to me implies that it wouldn't attract older audiences, but that's a separate point), and that young people are individuals, but there is an average, and I'm talking about that average.
I just wonder what exactly can you put in an adult book that you can't put in a kid's(Y/A) book. I assumed that it was gore, sex, violence and trauma. All of which are very core components of many stories, either two or three together, or separate, or all four in different quantities.
__________________
If trees could scream, would we be so quick to chop them down? We might, if they screamed all the time for no good reason.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-21-2014, 01:42 AM
Mike C's Avatar
Mike C (Offline)
Legend
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 9,117
Thanks: 99
Thanks 1,572
Send a message via MSN to Mike C
Default

I've read a lot of YA fiction, because several of my clients write it and they send me books.

I have to admit the first one shocked me a little because I was expecting inane, watered down for children stuff and it was far from it. Gore, rape, murder, sex... and a strong, indomitable female heroine.

My overall impression of YA (insofar as what I've read, maybe 20ish novels) is that to write a successful book, you write as if writing for adults (kids must have a high quality standard), but write about younger people facing issues that concern them - relationships, growing up, sexuality, abuse, drugs, whatever. Just like if you're writing for an adult audience.
__________________
لا شيء يدوم‎
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-21-2014, 07:39 AM
JoeMatt (Offline)
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 6,392
Thanks: 441
Thanks 1,526
Default

Twilight is BAD. It could destroy a generation of girls -- a least -- and turn them all into victims. Probably because they're not going to read or see anything else. I'm thinking it could undo 50 years worth of feminist propaganda.

As for Stephanie Myer -- I don't hate her. I might even do her after a case of beer.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-21-2014, 10:58 AM
Mohican's Avatar
Mohican (Offline)
Tall Poppy
Administration
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Not quite back of beyond
Posts: 4,050
Thanks: 363
Thanks 685
Default

Originally Posted by JoeMatt View Post
Twilight is BAD. t....... I'm thinking it could undo 50 years worth of feminist propaganda.

As for Stephanie Myer -- I don't hate her. I might even do her after a case of beer.
On the whole, undoing 50 years of feminist propaganda is a good thing.
__________________
If you surrender a civilization to avoid social disapproval, you should know that all of history will curse you for your cowardliness - Alice Teller

If John of Patmos would browse the internet today for half an hour, I don't know if the Book of Revelations would be entirely different or entirely the same.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-21-2014, 11:38 AM
JoeMatt (Offline)
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 6,392
Thanks: 441
Thanks 1,526
Default

Originally Posted by Mohican View Post
On the whole, undoing 50 years of feminist propaganda is a good thing.
Oh, I know. We made the mistake of educating women, then the next thing you know, they wanted to do things. Now all of society is going to hell in a hand basket.

Last edited by JoeMatt; 08-21-2014 at 11:52 AM..
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to JoeMatt For This Useful Post:
jimmymc (08-24-2014)
  #17  
Old 08-21-2014, 01:24 PM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

I'm assuming they did something to that book (which I've never read) when they reprinted it for teens, right?
What did they edit?
What separates the adult version and the teen version?
Nope. They did nothing to it. If it has actually happened to a teenager (which this did because he was 18-19 when he went off to war, and so did some younger boys) there is no reason for teenagers to not read it.
I just wonder what exactly can you put in an adult book that you can't put in a kid's(Y/A) book. I assumed that it was gore, sex, violence and trauma. All of which are very core components of many stories, either two or three together, or separate, or all four in different quantities.
Like I said, there is no point in censoring because if you do dumb it down or censor it, high school kids will only skip the teen books anyway, which is what they used to do, and still try to sometimes. I was once told to take out the drug references in my book, which I meant for 14+, even though all the drugs were either prescriptions or pain medication teens generally take with the permission of their parents.

Anyway, while I generally don't worry about one book influencing kids to make bad decisions, the obsession some girls have for the books and movies, and the fact that some of them read little else, does concern me. Some girls become very defensive when you say you don't like the book. If they don't have good examples of healthy relationships, which some probably won't, it could put them at a slightly greater risk than they already are of falling into dangerous traps.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Last edited by Rei; 08-21-2014 at 01:36 PM..
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Rei For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-24-2014)
  #18  
Old 08-21-2014, 04:40 PM
Front&Centre's Avatar
Front&Centre (Offline)
Heartbreaking Writer of Staggering Genius
Official Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: London
Posts: 1,289
Thanks: 201
Thanks 199
Default

I wonder if I should read some more Y/A stuff so I can get a handle on what most of it is actually comprised of.
__________________
If trees could scream, would we be so quick to chop them down? We might, if they screamed all the time for no good reason.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 08-21-2014, 06:09 PM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

The only thing books for teenagers have in common (with some exceptions) is a protagonist that is under 20.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 08-21-2014, 10:51 PM
donnaf (Offline)
Homer's Odyssey Was Nothing
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,056
Thanks: 663
Thanks 219
Default

I don't "hate" Stephanie Meyers. The Twilight series wasn't that interesting for me. Bella drove me nuts, she was a very annoying character. I didn't even bother to watch the movies, except for the last one and the best part of it was the big showdown scene.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 08-22-2014, 01:19 AM
Mike C's Avatar
Mike C (Offline)
Legend
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 9,117
Thanks: 99
Thanks 1,572
Send a message via MSN to Mike C
Default

Originally Posted by Front&Centre View Post
I wonder if I should read some more Y/A stuff so I can get a handle on what most of it is actually comprised of.
If I could recommend one book it would be The Dust of 100 Dogs by AS King. And I can arrange for you to chat to her too, shortly, I'll be running a Q&A session with her (details will appear in the classified section soon).
__________________
لا شيء يدوم‎
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mike C For This Useful Post:
Front&Centre (08-23-2014)
  #22  
Old 08-22-2014, 04:30 AM
crochetlady99's Avatar
crochetlady99 (Offline)
I Am My Own Master
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 100
Thanks: 29
Thanks 25
Default

YA is not only for 12-15. In this day and age many young ladies and gentlemen(more ladies), say in their early twenties, read YA. In fact, people under the age of eighteen make up only the minority of buyers of YA books. With the Twilight craze, most of the superfans were people in their thirties. And surely people won't become victims because of those books. There is truly no message to the story, just an entertaining read and the closest it comes to a message is 'love trumps all'. If someone is influenced, even someone young, by a fictional book, then perhaps that person needs to read nonfiction.

Sorry if I ranted a bit. Sometimes I get a strong need to defend a fellow writer. Good day to you all.
__________________
"The talent of writing is a gift from God."
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-22-2014, 06:45 AM
Fkegs (Offline)
Copyist
Official Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: London
Posts: 58
Thanks: 1
Thanks 7
Default

I think her writing is a ok. I don't like it when people say it's YA, that's just an excuse. If she want to write well then she should. People may not like the twilight series and will use it as a target to knock it down. I like her books but i don't like the mc.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-22-2014, 03:14 PM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

Crochetlady, what you see in this book is not love. It is abuse.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-23-2014, 07:33 AM
Mike C's Avatar
Mike C (Offline)
Legend
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 9,117
Thanks: 99
Thanks 1,572
Send a message via MSN to Mike C
Default

Originally Posted by crochetlady99 View Post
And surely people won't become victims because of those books.
That's a very (can't actually think of an appropriate word that conveys ignorance but is soft enough not to upset anyone) view; books instruct. They give validation. They provide role models. You do know about role models, and the whole point of them, don't you?
__________________
لا شيء يدوم‎
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mike C For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-24-2014)
  #26  
Old 08-23-2014, 03:56 PM
Rei's Avatar
Rei (Offline)
Verbosity Pales
Official Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Tardis
Posts: 3,488
Thanks: 269
Thanks 257
Default

The thing is, I don't believe healthy girls with a lot of good role models and an understanding of what a healthy relationship with a man looks like, will become victims. On the other hand, there are many girls who don't have that. It won't cause girls to become victims alone. There are other factors involved. A less popular book with an equally disturbing message wouldn't worry me as much. This book has been read by millions of girls who don't understand that Edward is abusive, and that popularity validates that it's fine for Bella to be with him. I've been there, and after six years I am still a bit shy about even shaking hands with unfamiliar men.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Rei For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-24-2014)
  #27  
Old 08-24-2014, 12:29 AM
Mike C's Avatar
Mike C (Offline)
Legend
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 9,117
Thanks: 99
Thanks 1,572
Send a message via MSN to Mike C
Default

I don't always agree with Rei but I'm 100% with her on this one. I would have been appalled if anyone had suggested to my daughter as she was growing up that being a victim is in any way OK. I brought her up to kick butt.
__________________
لا شيء يدوم‎
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mike C For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-24-2014)
  #28  
Old 08-24-2014, 03:44 AM
Floyd's Avatar
Floyd (Offline)
Dedicated Writer
Official Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 216
Thanks: 53
Thanks 49
Default

Originally Posted by Rei View Post
Nope. They did nothing to it. If it has actually happened to a teenager (which this did because he was 18-19 when he went off to war, and so did some younger boys) there is no reason for teenagers to not read it.
Like I said, there is no point in censoring because if you do dumb it down or censor it, high school kids will only skip the teen books anyway, which is what they used to do, and still try to sometimes. I was once told to take out the drug references in my book, which I meant for 14+, even though all the drugs were either prescriptions or pain medication teens generally take with the permission of their parents.
Having spent a large chunk of my summer discovering YA (I've spent most my teens hating YA on principle- I always thought it was like the Hunger Games and its ilk so avoided it), I can tell you that there is little censoring.
So far the books have included two people being sent to pschiatric hospitals, both of whom who were around 15, both of whom the author had, in detail, described using a LSD and cannabis. There's also been graphic depiction of sex, (straight and, for once, homosexual) depictions of suicide, death, someone being gutted alive with kitchen tools, and a serial killer.
Plus cigarettes, abusive parents, extensive monologues and dialogues on depression and mental illness.

Young Adult can involve anything from the mild innocence of young teen fiction (I once read a book where the sixteen year old protagonist was stabbed and only said 'Blast!') to all the REAL problems that affect youth today.

The only real definition of Young Adult fiction is fiction involving young adult protagonists.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Floyd For This Useful Post:
Rei (08-24-2014)
  #29  
Old 08-24-2014, 05:22 AM
Seedy M.'s Avatar
Seedy M. (Offline)
Profusive Denizen
Official Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Puerto Armuelles, Chiriqui, Panamá
Posts: 257
Thanks: 16
Thanks 74
Default

Being a geezer myself, it really was a kind of shock to learn that all the books in the Flight of the Maita fit the YA category perfectly, though its main readership is 28-36. I wrote one book specifically as YA, but that seems very easy in SciFi; Robert Cole Todd/Space Services.
RCT has been noted as being very good as YA because it has a moral, but the reader isn't constantly slammed over the head with a 2X4 with it. It's just part of the way I write. The moral is subtle, which is the difficult part of the process. The last line of the book sums up a large part of the moral: Who was it, Robert Cole Todd, who once said one man can't make a difference? That one man couldn't make a difference was stated early and not again mentioned to that point. You kind of knew it all the way through, but never thought of it. Here was a teenager growing up and making differences.
Today's styles seem destined to keep pounding on the moral, when they have one at all, until the reader is turned off by it.
IA, in a review, said, I finished the story, read the last line, looked at the lamp a second, and said to myself, "True!"
The stuff out there now is written with Special Effects in mind. Everybody, much as myself in the beginning, dreams of their book being made into a movie. They tend to write with that in mind. I was cured of that with After the Old Gods, where I had final say before I would sell it to a studio. What their script writers did made it as much as totally unrecognizable as the story I'd written. My story was about a plague that could wipe out a race. They added a space war (How can you call it SciFi without a space war?) and some steamy love scenes that had nothing to do with what I wrote.
I packed my book up and went home. That was the end of me wanting a movie made of my crap.
The trouble with writing YA (or anything else) today is there is no subtlety left in the world. At least it seems so to me.
Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Seedy M. For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-24-2014)
  #30  
Old 08-24-2014, 09:42 AM
jimmymc (Offline)
Word Wizard
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Tex/Okie
Posts: 660
Thanks: 208
Thanks 170
Default

Never read any of Myer's stuff, so I didn't know I was supposed to hate her. Thanks for the heads up.
Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to jimmymc For This Useful Post:
crochetlady99 (08-24-2014), Floyd (08-24-2014), Rei (08-24-2014)
Reply

  WritersBeat.com > General Discussion > Writers' Cafe


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Creep World (WIP) MalReynolds Fiction 21 09-07-2017 06:06 AM
Excerpt... (Strong Language) theophobiac Fiction 4 07-30-2008 04:10 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:31 AM.

vBulletin, Copyright © 2000-2006, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.