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Anyone here own any classic literature?

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  #1  
Old 09-14-2012, 03:30 PM
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Default Anyone here own any classic literature?


For me, I have The Brother's Grimm Fairy Tales, Sherlock Holmes, and Edgar Allan Poe. In fact, I think all three books I have are the complete works.

What does everyone else own?

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Old 09-14-2012, 10:58 PM
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It's a long list:
(these are just the hard copy I have kept - I have hundreds on my kindle)
Complete Works of Shakespeare
Complete Works of Burns
(does McGonaghall count?)
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
A variety of works by Plutarch
Rack Rent by Maria Edgeworth (I think)
Hope Leslie by Cathrine Maria Sedgwick
Heart of Midlothian by Walter Scott
Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K Jerome
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
What Katy Did, At School and Did Next by Susan Coolidge
Secret Garden by Frances Hodgeson Burnett
Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Tales of an African Farm by Ralph Iron/Olive Schrivener (sp??)
Mill on the Floss by George Eliot
Orinocco (sp??) by Aphra Behn
Thanks to my maiden name many copies of Fall of the House of Usher by Edgar Allan Poe
A variety of fairy tales.
Jane Eyre and Vilette by Charlotte Bronte
Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte
Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell
Pride and Prejudice, and Emma by Jane Austen
Early fantasy by William Morris, Lord Dunsany etc
Tom Brown's Schooldays by Thomas Hughes


I am sure I have missed some I'm not at home right now.
Also there are the modern classes like Agatha Christies, Enid Blyton, Roald Dahl etc

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Old 09-14-2012, 11:27 PM
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I'm new here...don't eat me (:

I'm working on my classic literature collection. So far the only three I have are Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, A Study In Scarlet by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and The Sign of Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. On my "To read" list is The Great Gatsby and the next classic literature book on my "To buy" list is The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes.

I read and was not a huge fan of Romeo and Juliet. I prefer classic mystery to classic romance, but I'll give anything a try.

Any suggestions?
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:32 PM
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King Lear
Othello
Macbeth
Hamlet

Shakespeare wrote more than just Romeo and Juliet.
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Old 09-14-2012, 11:43 PM
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Icon1 RE: luckyme

Thanks luckyme! I think I'll give Macbeth a try, from what I understand it leans less towards romance and more towards the macabre.
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Old 09-15-2012, 07:29 AM
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I love to see readers taking up the Classics, because they really are beautiful, deep, and historical touchstones for us in the present. I like your list, Anya. 2Men, one of my favorites is The Great Gatsby. Also, Seize the Day by Saul Bellows. I just read for the first time Vanity Fair, which had a slightly irritating heroine named Becky Sharp. My favorite besides Make Way for Lucia is Charles Dickens' Bleak House (once you get past the confusing first chapter).
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Old 09-15-2012, 07:42 AM
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The Three Musketeers
The Legend of King Arthur and His Knights
Lord of the Rings Tiligy
The Hobbit
The Chronicles of Narnia
Alice in Wonderland
Mary Poppins
Peter Pan
The Secret Garden
The Wizard of Oz
Black Beauty
Stuart Little
Charlottes Web
The Trumpet of the Swan
Robinson Crusoe - hated it!
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
The Picture of Dorian Gray
A Moveable Feast
The Oresteia
A Midsummer Night's Dream
Mrs. Dalloway
The Dubliners
Tropic of Cancer
Tropic of Capricorn
Lolita

I have others that I am yet to read.

Last edited by Redlorry; 09-15-2012 at 07:45 AM..
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Old 09-15-2012, 07:48 AM
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I feel a bit uncomfortable now that everyone has more literature than me!

But technically, I have four novels, 125 short stories, nearly 200 fairy tales, if not more, as well as as 50 poems including The Raven.


Okay, I got some bragging rights...
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Old 09-15-2012, 08:58 AM
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Well. There's what I own, what I have in my house, and what I've read.

What I own? Not a lot, any more. Since Project Gutenberg came out, I've given away a lot of my classical literature to the local Oxfam book shop, mainly so as to make room on my shelves.

What I have in my house? My mum was an English teacher for forty years, and I've got her entire collection. My wife's an avid reader, and so's my son. We've got about 4,000 books in the house. Probably 1,000 of so of those are Victorian or before.

What have I read? Err, in rough order of publication, the Iliad and the Odyssey (translations), Beowulf (translations), the Prose Edda (translation), Njal's Saga (translation), Le Mort Darthur (original), about three quarters of the Canterbury Tales (but no other Chaucer)(originals and translations), 34 of Shakespeare's plays plus a Ben Jonson (Epicoene) and a Christopher Marlowe (The Jew of Malta), two Molieres (L'École des Femmes and Le Malade imaginaire)(originals), Swift's Gulliver's Travels (original), Voltaire's Candide (original), everything Jane Austen ever wrote, two Mary Shelleys (Frankenstein and The Last Man), about 4 Edgar Allen Poes, Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte, 6 Dickens novels, Darwin's Origin of Species, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and Journey to the Centre of the Earth by Jules Verne (translations), about a dozen different novels and novellas by HG Wells, Dracula by Bram Stoker, Tess of the D'Urbervilles and Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy, 50-odd assorted novels and short stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and then we're into the twentieth century which doesn't really count as "classic" any more.

I studied English, French and German to A-level; it gives you a headstart and a taste for this stuff...
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English is a strange language. It can be understood through tough thorough thought though.

Last edited by Non Serviam; 09-15-2012 at 09:07 AM.. Reason: Forgot some...
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Old 09-15-2012, 08:47 PM
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Luciaphile, I just borrowed my sister's copy of The Great Gatsby and I can see why it's your favorite. I'm up to chapter 3 and the atmosphere of 1920s New York walks (saunters with a tumbler of whiskey?) right off the page.
Definitely one for the collection.
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Old 09-16-2012, 10:03 AM
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Anyone here own any classic literature?
Yes.
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Old 09-16-2012, 03:49 PM
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CandraH, any favorites?
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Old 09-16-2012, 04:46 PM
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I managed to forget my favourites (I'm away from home right now).

I have a copy of the Canterbury Tales by Chaucer

I love the original gothic horror stories:

Moonstone, Woman in White and Armadale by Wilkie Collins
The Monk by Matthew Lewis
The Old English Baron by Clara Reeve
The Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Radcliffe.

I also have a book with some of Marlowe's plays in and Faustus makes for a fantastic horror.

A love of Dickens has just been reawakened by the wonderful Dickens' Women which is a one woman show with Miriam Margolyes (sp??) she played Professor Sprout in Harry Potter. I believe it is going to the US next. I'm never going to look at his women the same again. Once I've finished Les Miserables and Hollow Earth (not a classic literature it is a recent fantasy)

Shakespeare was not meant to be read and is best watched. Most people experience the heavily edited schools editions (all the 'mucky' bits taken out). I love watching the plays. My favourite is Henry IV there is a wonderful scene between Prince Hal (later Henry V) and Falstaff where Prince Hal is calling Falstaff fat and Falstaff is calling Prince Hal too thin. (climbs off her Shakespeare soap box lol) Macbeth is really good and contains a poisonous love story. I used to live at the bottom of the hill where one of the Macbeth witches was executed. (Rolled down a hill in a spiked barrel and then set alight). If you like fantasy then Midsummer Night's Dream and The Tempest are wonderful.

My Classic collection is huge because they were cheap books to read. In school I could get two or three a week for a pound each and these days I can get them free on the Kindle.

I also own the Bible, Book of Mormon, Quran and the Mahabharata - whatever I believe they contain some of the most amazing stories ever written.

Last edited by AnyaKimlun; 09-16-2012 at 04:59 PM..
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Old 09-16-2012, 04:55 PM
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I'm a shameless sucker for buying the three dollar classics at Books-A-Million, Anya, I know what you mean about cheap reads
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Old 09-21-2012, 09:12 AM
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Old 09-21-2012, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by 2Men&aLoveStory View Post
CandraH, any favorites?
Yes.
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Old 09-21-2012, 05:36 PM
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Icon7 RE: CandraH

My favorite (now that I've read it) is hands down the Great Gatsby. What's yours?
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Old 09-22-2012, 11:11 AM
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Too many to list, but I recommend Othello as a Shakespeare play. I love Canterbury Tales too.
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Old 09-22-2012, 03:50 PM
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Peter Pan kicked ass. Treasure Island was an awesome adventure. I haven't read a whole lot of classic literature I really enjoyed so...Huck Finn was a fun read. I'll be reading King Lear and Othello for AP English I think, and I read some of the Canterbury Tales as well, it was great. I will probably read the whole thing eventually. Beowulf was good. JRR Tolkien is amazing...yeah.
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Old 09-24-2012, 01:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Marshin View Post
I'll be reading King Lear and Othello for AP English I think,
Try to see them performed first, before school sucks the joy out of them.
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Old 09-24-2012, 02:15 AM
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I have so much classic literature that if my collection fell on me, I would die, seriously...
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Old 09-24-2012, 04:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike C View Post
Try to see them performed first, before school sucks the joy out of them.
For once Mike and I are in complete agreement. Even if you hold of an old DVD of a production it is an improvement on being 'taught'' Shakespeare. He was the blockbuster script writer of his day, in a time when people didn't know about privacy in the bedroom and went to hangings like we attend sport games.
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Old 09-24-2012, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by 2Men&aLoveStory View Post
My favorite (now that I've read it) is hands down the Great Gatsby. What's yours?
Haha. Excellent. You get points for working so hard to draw me out.

Originally Posted by Mike C View Post
Try to see them performed first, before school sucks the joy out of them.
Even without seeing a live performance, I loved Othello as a read. Really cool and powerful stuff. And like young Dela said elsewhere, Iago is a fantastic villain.
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Old 09-24-2012, 07:58 AM
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RE: CandraH

I'm a pushy little creature ;-) I haven't personally read Othello, but it as well as Macbeth is on my list of possible "to reads."
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:35 PM
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to the OP, surely anyone who fancies themselves a writer is bound to have read at least a few solid classics - even if they don't 'own' same. seems an odd question to be asking in a writers forum.

harking back to my device du jour .. it's a bit like asking a room full of ambitious young chefs if any of them have heard of Wolfgang Puck, or own a cookbook written by someone with lots of michi stars. if that's not a clear enough analogy ... imagine an ambitious young chef telling you he'd drawn all his inspiration from Burger King.
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Old 01-22-2013, 07:24 PM
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I have read and owned and sill own many classics. Most mentioned here.

Those not mentioned ..

Herman Melville ...
In the Piazza tales is one called Bartleby. This would be my favourite. The only story where I have wet my pants laughin, and also shed a tear.

Moby Dick is a very very heavy read.

Classics that I own that are first editions or special prints.

The Thousand Nights and one night. Richard Burton (about 16 volumes)

Gesta Romanorum (A Roman Catholic ripoff of the 1000 nights and reprinted with Catholic morals attached .. but very interesting as it contains many of Shakespeare's plays and was written 600 years (I tink) before he was born.

The Feynman lectures. Richard Feynman
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Old 01-22-2013, 08:39 PM
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1984
Fahrenheit 451
Frankenstein
I kept most of my old English text books, especially the one with Heart of Darkness in it (I read it every so often and dream I could write as well as Conrad could) but they are filled with classics I love to re-read from time to time.
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Old 01-22-2013, 08:47 PM
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I had some Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky at one point. Don't really know what happened to em. Currently reading Nietzsche's will to power.
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Old 01-22-2013, 09:43 PM
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I once had an exstensive collection of classic literature but one day I decided to take them to a small mom and pop used book store and sell them to the owners on the idea that others might enjoy them. I bought books with the proceeds.

My short list;

The Complete Short Stories of Tennessee Williams (amazing literature)
The Cider House Rules by Irving (a great story beautifully written)
Water For Elephants (well done with a story for the ages)
Devil In The White City (two true stories that occurred at the same time woven together)
Letters in Red..a marvelous murderous book part truth and part fiction..great writing by two soon to be famously talented authors

Enough for now.
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Old 02-20-2013, 04:10 AM
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Originally Posted by 2Men&aLoveStory View Post
Thanks luckyme! I think I'll give Macbeth a try, from what I understand it leans less towards romance and more towards the macabre.
This post had me smiling all morning....yes much less romance in Macbeth.

Ever read Bradbury's "Something Wicked this Way Comes"? The title comes from Macbeth. I had to read Macbeth in High-school and was surprised by how much I loved it. I enjoyed most of the Bard's other works, but Macbeth I loved. I am sure you will too.
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